HSLI Annual Conference

Between Starved Rock and a Hard Place: Navigating the Age of COVID

2021 Conference is a Virtual Event

 

Registration

Registration is open!

There is no charge for HSLI members with dues paid for 2021.

Register Online to Attend HSLI 2021

Print and Mail Registration

Conference dates: Wednesday, October 27 - Friday, October 29, 2021

Program Summary

Tuesday 10/26/2021

Board Meeting – 11am

Wednesday 10/27/2021    

Welcome – 10am 
Keynote – 10:15am
Sponsor highlights – 11:30am
NNLM / Region 6 Update – 1:30pm
Poster Session – 2pm

Thursday 10/28/2021       

CE: Charting a New Course: practical data visualization for librarians – 10am
Sponsor highlights – 12pm

Springer Nature  - 12:00-12:20
Doody’s – 12:20-12:30

NNLM Region 6 – Office Hours for open questions with Jacqueline Leskovec 12:40-1:15
CE: Supporting Medical Education through Emerging Technologies and Innovation Services – 2pm
Nancy’s Reception – 4pm

Friday 10/29/2021         

HSLI Business meeting – 10am
Updates (ISL, IACRL, RAILS, CARLI) – 11am
CE: Evidence Based Medicine and Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine – 1pm
Wrap-up session, 2022 Conference preview - 2pm

 

Keynote Speaker

Catherine Arnott Smith, PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison Woman wearing purple half-rim glasses. She has chin length white hair and is wearing and a purple sweater

From medical librarianship to medical informatics: My adventures with small data
“Consumer health informatics” as a term refers to that part of medical informatics that focuses on consumer and patient perspectives, simultaneously as users and contributors to information systems that empower them to manage their own health.  In this very broad field, any space in which consumers and patients interact with information and information systems is included. This includes the design and deployment of decision support tools, communication tools (patient to patient, or clinician to patient), and therapies that enhance interpersonal relationships. It also includes attention to health information sources themselves, for example, the quality of health information exchanged in online patient communities or made available on the Web. Finally, the effects on the larger society in which health information is exchanged are researchable questions in consumer health informatics. In this talk, I’ll explain how my beginnings as a medical librarian in academic and industry settings inform my current research agenda in consumer health informatics – and the ways in which all medical librarians are critical to the enterprise.

Continuing Education

Charting a new course: practical data visualization for librarians
Approved for 2 hours MLA CE credit

Data visualization is used to communicate complex information and explore trends in large sources of data. Compelling data visualization requires thoughtful planning and execution; from understanding the data, choosing the right chart, balancing visual cues, and providing narratives to tell interesting stories. This course gives attendees a strong foundation in the principles of data visualization. In addition, attendees will use Microsoft Excel, a common but incredibly powerful tool, to visualize library-relevant data through a series of hands-on activities. Attendees will gain practical and immediately useful skills for visualizing both qualitative and quantitative data.


Smiling woman with shoulder length dark blond hair. She is wearing a blue shirt and a pearl necklace with matching earrings.Annette Mendoza is the Research Impact Librarian at Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center at Northwestern University. As a member of the Research Assessment and Communication Department she assists in the creation and delivery of training sessions, guides, and consultations on the topics related to understanding and communicating research impact. Visual explanations of data is a valuable part of telling a story and Annette is dedicated to helping others master the utilization of tools they have access to, like Excel, for creating interesting graphics.






Smiling woman with short dark hair. She is wearing a black shirt and small earings.

Karen Gutzman is the Head of the Research Assessment and Communications Department at Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center at Northwestern University where she develops, supports, and implements programs that increase awareness about digital scholarship and issues in the digital environment among faculty, researchers, and students at Feinberg School of Medicine. Karen works with library colleagues on preservation and access to scholarly outputs through a digital repository and other digital means, and she provides expertise for campus-wide digital preservation activities. Karen work also focuses on using information visualization to facilitate stronger comprehension of data in the assessment process. She regularly uses tools in her work such as VOSViewer, Science of Science Tool, Gephi, Excel, and Tableau.

 

Supporting Medical Education through Emerging Technologies and Innovation Services

In this session you will learn how the Library can support medical education through emerging technology services. See examples of how emerging tech is being applied in libraries throughout the nation and learn how to develop your own services. Gain insight into the fundamental question of “Why is the Library providing access to emerging tech?”

Formal portrait of Alisandro wearing a blue dress shirt with open collar. He has dark hair worn in a side part and a short facial hair along his jawline on his chin.Elisandro Cabada is an Assistant Professor and Medical and Bioengineering Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he leads the technology-rich library IDEA Lab digital scholarship center. Elisandro holds faculty appointments in the University Library and in the engineering-based Carle Illinois College of Medicine. His research interests include studying the barriers to access, pedagogical affordances, and application of emerging and immersive technologies in research and instruction.

 

 

 

EBM for Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine (CAIM)

According to the National Institutes of Health, more than 30% of adults use non-conventional approaches to medical care. The terms “complementary” and “alternative” and “integrative” are commonly used to describe non-traditional medicine but there are distinctions. Complementary approaches are used in combination with conventional medicine and alternative approaches are used in place of traditional medicine. These therapies can include nutritional, physical, or psychological approaches and can be used in various combinations. Integrative medicine represents a coordinated strategy that includes both conventional and complementary approaches to health care.
These therapies are considered by some to be little hoaxes or snake oil, but are lifelines for others. And so, it is critical to consider these approaches through the lens of evidence-based medicine (EBM). This session will present the basics of CAIM and discuss the intersection of CAIM and EBM through an interactive case study. In this climate of mis and dis-information, it is critical to consider the science to inform decision making for traditional, non-traditional, and integrated management or prevention in health care.

Photo of Peg wearing a green shirt and black wrap. She has short dark hair with bangs. She is wearing a gold necklace.Peg (Margaret) Burnette
Associate Professor and Medical and Biomedicine Library

Peg’s current position as Medical and Biomedicine Librarian for a new medical school, requires deep engagement with faculty, staff, and students in supporting the research and education missions.  In addition to facilitating access to resources, supporting student and faculty scholarship, Peg provides regular instruction to both students and faculty in the areas of Evidence-based Medicine, Medical Education Research, Data Management and more.
Prior to coming to the University of Illinois in 2012, Peg was at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Library of the Health Sciences-Peoria where she supported faculty, researchers, and medical and nursing students in all aspects of medical education and informatics.

Conference News

Final Reminder: Deadline to Register for Health Science Librarians of Illinois Annual Conference (Online Oct. 27-29) is Fri., Oct. 22

October 20th, 2021 by

(via the HSLI Conference Planning Committee)

The deadline to register for the 2021 Health Science Librarians of Illinois Annual Conference is quickly approaching! Sign up by Friday, October 22, to attend this year’s meeting. Themed “Between Starved Rock and a Hard Place: Navigating the Age of COVID”, the Conference will take place entirely online, from Wednesday, October 27, to Friday, October 29. The cost to register is free for current HSLI members, $10.00 for non-members, and $5.00 for students.

The Conference will include a keynoter, several continuing-education sessions, and posters. Attendees will also have an opportunity to hear updates from vendors and library organizations.

To view the full Conference schedule, and to register, please go here. We hope to see you next week!

CE Sessions Available at HSLI Annual Conference at No Additional Charge (Registration Deadline Fri., Oct. 22)

October 6th, 2021 by

(via Julie Dietrich, Blessing Health Professions Library)

The Health Science Librarians of Illinois (HSLI) will offer three-continuing education sessions at the annual virtual conference. Registration is still open! To register, go here. The deadline is Friday, October 22.

CE1:  Charting a new course: practical data visualization for librarians presented by Annette Mendoza and Karen Gutzman
2 MLA CE
Data visualization is used to communicate complex information and explore trends in large sources of data. Compelling data visualization requires thoughtful planning and execution; from understanding the data, choosing the right chart, balancing visual cues, and providing narratives to tell interesting stories. This course gives attendees a strong foundation in the principles of data visualization. In addition, attendees will use Microsoft Excel, a common but incredibly powerful tool, to visualize library-relevant data through a series of hands-on activities. Attendees will gain practical and immediately useful skills for visualizing both qualitative and quantitative data.

CE2:  Supporting Medical Education through Emerging Technologies and Innovation Services presented by Elisandro Cabada
No CE credit
In this session you will learn how the Library can support medical education through emerging technology services. See examples of how emerging tech is being applied in libraries throughout the nation and learn how to develop your own services. Gain insight into the fundamental question of “Why is the Library providing access to emerging tech?”

CE3:  Evidence Based Medicine for Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine (CAIM) presented by Peg (Margaret) Burnette
No CE credit
According to the National Institutes of Health, more than 30% of adults use non-conventional approaches to medical care. The terms “complementary” and “alternative” and “integrative” are commonly used to describe non-traditional medicine but there are distinctions. Complementary approaches are used in combination with conventional medicine and alternative approaches are used in place of traditional medicine. These therapies can include nutritional, physical, or psychological approaches and can be used in various combinations. Integrative medicine represents a coordinated strategy that includes both conventional and complementary approaches to health care.

These therapies are considered by some to be little hoaxes or snake oil, but are lifelines for others. And so, it is critical to consider these approaches through the lens of evidence-based medicine (EBM). This session will present the basics of CAIM and discuss the intersection of CAIM and EBM through an interactive case study. In this climate of mis- and dis-information, it is critical to consider the science to inform decision making for traditional, non-traditional, and integrated management or prevention in health care.



HSLI Conference Registration Open (Deadline Fri., Oct. 22)

September 22nd, 2021 by

(via Julie Dietrich, Blessing Health Professions Library)

Between Starved Rock and a Hard Place: Navigating the Age of COVID

The Annual Health Science Librarians of Illinois (HSLI) conference will be held virtually Wednesday, October 27th – Friday, October 29th. Registration is open now! CEs and posters will highlight the conference. FREE for current HSLI members, $10 for non-members, and $5 for students. Deadline for registration is Friday, October 22nd.

Registration and program information is listed here. Please note that all times listed in the program are Central.

Conference Sponsors and Exhibitors

Thank you to our HSLI 2021 Annual Meeting SPONSORS!

VisualDx is a company dedicated to improving medical decisions through augmented thinking and timely visualization. It is committed to reducing disparities in medicine and believes technology can bridge gaps in knowledge to bring about more equitable care. The professional product, VisualDx, is the award-winning diagnostic clinical decision support system that has become the standard professional resource at more than 2,300 hospitals worldwide and over half the U.S. medical schools. Learn more at www.visualdx.com

Wolters Kluwer is a leading global provider of trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that help healthcare professionals build clinical competency and effective decision-making to improve outcomes

Rittenhouse is your single source for effortlessly finding trusted, vetted, and quality health sciences content from the leading health sciences publishers and associations. We are dedicated to helping you find what you need and move forward with knowledge from the world of health sciences. The R2 Digital Library, Rittenhouse's market-leading eBook platform, provides institutional partners with access to thousands of essential and specialized titles in an intuitive interface optimized for use in health sciences. This innovative platform, along with print materials available through Rittenhouse, enables partners to access information any way they wish.

Springer Nature is a leading global scientific, scholarly, professional and educational publisher, home to an array of respected and trusted brands providing quality content through a range of innovative products and services. Springer Nature is the world's largest academic book publisher, publisher of the world's highest impact journals and a pioneer in the field of open research. The company numbers almost 13,000 staff in over 50 countries

Since 1993, Doody Enterprises has been the most trusted source of timely, expert reviews of newly published books in the health sciences. We specialize in timely, targeted information update services for health sciences librarians that combine customized weekly literature update emails with content-rich websites. To provide these unique information services, Doody’s works with 100+ book publishers in the health sciences and more than 9,400 academic health sciences professionals as expert reviewers. Our product line, recognized worldwide by health sciences librarians, includes Doody’s Review Service®, Doody’s Core Titles®, Doody’s Collection Development Monthly, and our newest offering, Doody’s Special Topics Lists.

Poster Session

Holistic Thinking in Collections and Collection Development

Ramune Kubilius

Libraries’ sizes and organizational structures differ when it comes to assignment of official responsibilities for collection development and management. Publisher and vendor questionnaires ask whether one has final responsibility or an advisory role in decision-making. An argument can be made that we all can and should have a role in knowing about and providing information resources for our primary users, no matter our official job responsibilities. And more. Especially in today’s scholarly communications and publishing landscape. A few use cases will be shared that make the argument that we all have and can take advantage of various opportunities to monitor, watch, be informed about, act on, or "connect the dots" in health sciences collections-related work- in our libraries, in our parent institutions, and professionally. As new publishing trends bring new resources to the forefront, many that are free, traditional print collections and online subscriptions no longer should limit our definitions of “collections-related work”.  Official duties and job titles should not limit us from thinking and acting holistically, in order to also take advantage of  opportunities provided by interim responsibilities, committees and working groups.

Building a COVID-19 Web Archive

Claire Drone-Silvers

One of the many challenges of the COVID-19 global pandemic has been staying abreast of the rapidly changing guidelines and public policies from government entities, public health organizations, and local schools and businesses. Beginning in the spring of 2020, the Ruth Lilly Special Collections and Archives at Indiana University Purdue University – Indianapolis undertook a grant-funded web archiving project to document and preserve the numerous, varied, and often ephemeral responses to COVID-19 from organizations throughout Central Indiana. Since much of the information about the pandemic has been relayed through online sources, rapid-response web archiving has become especially important to capture short-lived digital information. Using Archive-It, a hosted service from the non-profit Internet Archive, we have been
able to crawl over 400 seeds (URLs) and have captured local schools’ reopening guidelines, public health mandates and statistics, vaccination updates, changes to community events, and much more. Archive-It is easy to use and its subscription model – which never deletes captured data – is particularly attractive for grant projects such as this one. Due to financial, ethical, and privacy considerations, we decided not to collect personal stories and chose instead to focus our collecting efforts on organizations (such as schools, local businesses, and government bodies) whose frequent online updates might not have been captured otherwise. This web archiving
project caused us to consider many issues of actively collecting during a public health crisis, and how to ethically select which material to capture and which to let disappear within a finite data budget. Our lessons can help inform other libraries’ projects documenting public health or crisis events.

A Step Toward Menstrual Justice: What Is It and What Can Libraries Do?

Emily Zerrenner

When you read the title and began the abstract for this poster, did you feel uncomfortable? Every single day, those who menstruate experience oppression related to this natural bodily function, not the least of which is the stigma surrounding menstruation all together. The menstrual cycle can be seen as dirty or unclean in our culture, which then passes on to the person menstruating (Crays 135). Products such as pads or tampons are often taxed in their respective states, and this unavoidable biological operation financially affects women, girls, transgender men and boys, and nonbinary people for a huge span of their lives. Progress can begin when we start talking about it, so this poster will cover the basics of menstrual justice to then lead us into the ways that libraries are poised in a position to catapult this movement even further. Whether they are a public or academic library, they are trusted places for information and can contribute to menstrual justice to make the world more equitable for all. Crays, A. (2020), Menstrual equity and justice in the United States. Sexuality, Gender & Policy, 3: 134-147. https://doi.org/10.1002/sgp2.12023

From Snail Mail to Email: 50 Year History of Interlibrary Loan Document Retrieval at Webster Library, Evanston Hospital

Linda Feinberg

Evanston Hospital has quality patient care, a long history of varied research, and an academic affiliation. Our library users include university (first Northwestern University and now University of Chicago) affiliated students, residents and faculty, and a variety of other health care professional programs such as our School of Nurse Anesthesia, and physical therapy, occupational therapy, and radiation therapy students. Over the last 5 decades we have tried many methods to improve our turnaround time for interlibrary loan requests. We started with mailing ALA ILL forms and receiving copies or originals via USPS, usually a 2-3 week turnaround. Our current method of Docline requesting then receiving pdf’s via e-mail has same day to 2 day turnaround averages. This poster traces our last 50 year’s historical evolution of document retrieval. What I think was our unique method in the 1970’s & 1980’s was in-person retrieval. We are next to a CTA Purple Line “L” stop that gives us easy access to the metropolitan area. Learning the transit system of Chicago, getting a nap in during the day (I never slept over my stop, waking up the stop before or at least in time to exit), and discovering the rich variety of medical libraries available within a reasonable distance were just a few additional advantages I received by going in-person to copy or check out interlibrary loan requests for our library users. The main advantage being that depending on the request day, and timing of our trips, turnaround time was anywhere between 1-5 days. Providing timely interlibrary loan materials has never been more necessary. Though our request levels have been reduced because of digital collections there will still always be need for older, esoteric, and non-digitized resources.

 

Conference Committee

Conference Co-Chairs
Cynthia Reynolds, University of Illinois at Chicago
Roy Jones, Retired


Continuing Education
Frances Drone-Silvers, Carle Health System
Erin Kerby, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Peggy Carey, National University of Health Sciences


Exhibitors
Eric Edwards, Illinois State Library
Peg Burnette, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Finance
Laura Wimmer, Amita Health


Nancy’s Reception
Sarah Isaacs, Illinois Dept. Human Services, University of Illinois-Urbana
Ramune Kubilius, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine


Posters
Charlotte Beyer, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science
Jonna Peterson, Northwestern University Galter Health Sciences Library


Program
Linda Feinberg, NorthShore University HealthSystem


Publicity
Eric Edwards, Illinois State Library
Julie Dietrich, Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing & Health Sciences


Region 6 Liaison
Jacqueline Leskovec, Network of the National Library of Medicine, Region 6


Registration
Cynthia Reynolds, University of Illinois at Chicago
Pat Genardo, National University of Health Sciences


Speakers
Michelle Nielsen Ott, Methodist College
Deborah Lauseng, University of Illinois at Chicago    


Website
Stacey Knight-Davis, Eastern Illinois University  


Advisory
Miranda Shake,   Lakeview College of Nursing
Lesley Wolfgang, Hospital Sisters Health System
Cynthia Snyder, Midwestern University